Large companies maintain the boycott against Facebook

The number of Facebook ads has fallen considerably following the economic uncertainty generated by the COVID-19 outbreak. As if this weren't enough, the company, which collects approximately $70 billion annually from advertising, has been attacked by major international companies as part of the Stop Hate for Profit campaign, a name that could be translated into Spanish as No al Odio por Dinero.

Large companies maintain the boycott against Facebook

The number of Facebook ads has fallen considerably following the economic uncertainty generated by the COVID-19 outbreak. As if this weren't enough, the company, which collects approximately $70 billion annually from advertising, has been attacked by major international companies as part of the Stop Hate for Profit campaign, a name that could be translated into Spanish as No al Odio por Dinero. The decision by these companies to restrict their advertising on this platform and Instagram is part of the boycott of Facebook to take action against racist comments, violence and hate.

Campaign ObjectivesOne

of the main demands of the Facebook boycott is the perpetuation of white supremacy through hate-filled messages that promote violence and racism.

In order for this well-known social network to take the necessary measures to stop the dissemination of racist content that threatens the security of different minority groups, various human rights and civil rights organizations came together in a collective demand under the name Stop Hate for Profit. The campaign has put pressure on the world's largest companies to remove their Facebook ads at least for the month of July. Starbucks is one of the last multinationals to decide to stop advertising on the platform. Companies such as Unilever, Coca-Cola and Patagonia have also joined the collective complaint and maintained the boycott against this platform after the organizations spoke with Mark Zuckerberg.

FacebookMark

Zuckerberg

's response

announced that Facebook will be subjected to controls to analyse messages with racist content and that promote violence. In addition, he is willing to take the steps that other social networks, such as Twitter, have already taken to detect and moderate posts that promote hate and announced that he will label posts related to his headquarters so that users are informed. He and one of his top executives were willing to resolve the conflict, but after meeting with some of the organizations that initiated the boycott, they failed. The organizations brought to the meeting some guidelines that Facebook should follow, but they did not get the expected response from Zuckerberg.

Facebook promised to hire a human rights specialist but it was not enough to stop the boycott that more than 700 companies have against them. Under the name Stop Hate for Porfit, leading human rights and civil rights organizations are joining together in a collective complaint against Facebook and the dissemination of messages that encourage hate, promote racism and perpetuate white supremacy. The world's leading international companies have joined the campaign and decided to remove their advertisements from the platform. Despite Mark Zuckerberg's response, the boycott remains in place and, for the moment, Starbucks is the last company to join the call.

Noah Brown
Noah Brown

Devoted twitter geek. Total beer practitioner. Freelance communicator. Subtly charming tv junkie. Avid social media specialist.